Monitoring Teacher Supply 2011

Monitoring Teacher Supply 2011 (pdf)
01 Jan 1970
pdf
Monitoring Teacher Supply 2011 (doc)
01 Jan 1970
doc

The Research Division of the Ministry of  Education conducts the Survey of Staffing annually to provide the Ministry with a snapshot of the number of entitlement  staffing vacancies and re-advertised vacancies in schools at the start of Term 1. In 2011, the survey was completed by 90% of all state and state-integrated schools.

Key Results

The Research Division of the Ministry of Education conducts the Survey of Staffing annually to provide the Ministry with a snapshot of the number of entitlement staffing vacancies1 and re-advertised vacancies in schools at the start of Term 1. In 2011, the survey was completed by 90% of all state and state-integrated schools.

Vacancies in New Zealand schools at the beginning of the 2011 school year represented just 0.5% of all entitlement positions. Although the proportion of teacher vacancies had increased slightly compared with last year (0.4% in 2010), there were still fewer vacancies than had been in the 2004-2009 period (0.8% in 2009, 0.9% in 2005 to 2008 and 1.1% in 2004).

Different patterns in teacher vacancies over the past three years were evident for primary and secondary schools. Vacancies in primary schools decreased for the third consecutive year (0.4% in 2011, 0.5% in 2010 and 0.7% in 2009). Over the past eight years, the proportion of vacancies in the primary sector has been consistently trending downward. Vacancies in secondary schools (0.6% in 2011) were slightly higher than they were last year (0.4% in 2010). Despite this increase, vacancies in secondary schools remained lower than they had been at any time between 2004 and 2009 (0.8% in 2009, 1.1% in 2008, 1.0% in 2005-2007 and 1.4% in 2004). The subject areas with the highest number of vacancies in secondary schools were mathematics and statistics and Māori (Te Reo Māori and Māori Medium/bilingual).

Re-advertised positions in schools are considered to be an indication of ‘hard-to-staff’ positions. In 2011, just over one-third (39%) of all entitlement vacancies at the beginning of Term 1 had been re-advertised. These re-advertised vacancies represented 0.2% of all FTTE entitlement positions, a slight increase from 0.1% in 2010. Consistent with ongoing trends, vacancies and re-advertised vacancies (as a proportion of all entitlement positions) were greatest in rural schools (population <1,000), schools with the highest proportion of Māori students on their roll, and low decile schools (1-3).

The survey also examined other sources of teacher supply for New Zealand schools, including the recruitment of first and second year (beginning) teachers and overseas-trained teachers. Consistent with previous years, just over half (53%) of primary schools and the majority (83%) of secondary schools had first and/or second year beginning teachers on & their staff in 2011. Beginning teachers in the primary sector have declined in number over the past four years. Beginning teachers comprised 7.1% of the teaching population in primary schools in 2011 (compared with 7.8% in 2010, 8.6% in 2009, and 9.3% in 2008). The number of beginning teachers in the secondary sector has fluctuated over the last four years (7.2% of the teaching population in 2001, 6.6% in 2010, 6.2% in 2009 and 7.6% in 2008).

The number of overseas-trained teachers has also been trending downward. In 2011, primary and secondary schools employed 422 overseas-trained teachers who began teaching in New Zealand in 2010 or 2011. This is a notable decrease in the equivalent number of overseas-trained teachers from 2010/2009 (537 teachers) and 2009/2008 (693 teachers).

Page last modified: 15 Mar 2018