Information sharing between government agencies – Cultural perspectives: Research discussion paper

Information sharing between government agencies - ...
01 Aug 2013
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This research project was conducted to explore the attitudinal differences for Māori and Pasifika peoples towards increased information sharing between government agencies. Participants from the Asian community were also included, as this is the other major non-European cultural group in New Zealand.

Purpose

In line with the Government’s aim of ‘New Zealanders being able to complete their transactions with government easily in a digital environment’ (Better Public Services; Result 101), Inland Revenue (IR) is currently increasing its information sharing with other government departments.

IR was aware that there would be sensitivities around information sharing by government departments. As part of its policy development, IR began researching people’s views on information sharing (Lips, M., et al., 2010; Litmus, 2011; Inland Revenue & Litmus, 2012; Gregory, V., 2012; Inland Revenue & Research New Zealand, 2013; Bennett, A., 2013).

This discussion paper explores cultural perspectives on information sharing by government departments.

Methodology

This research project was conducted to explore the attitudinal differences for Maori and Pasifika peoples towards increased information sharing between government agencies. In accordance with the Treaty of Waitangi, this study had particular emphasis on the views of Māori. Participants from the Asian community were also included as this is the other major non-European cultural group in New Zealand.

Qualitative interviews were carried out with ten community cultural representatives, 19 IR staff, and nine members of relevant government organisations on cultural perspectives regarding government agencies sharing information (see Appendix for details). Interviewing took place between February and April 2013, and was conducted by a senior researcher and a senior evaluator from IR’s National Research & Evaluation Unit (R&E).

 

Key Results

The participants in this research project had similar views about the benefits of government information sharing. They see it as potentially beneficial but also needing strong protocols for privacy, data quality, transparency, and consent.

However, our indicative findings are that Māori and Pasifika participants are less comfortable than Asian participants with government information sharing.

Page last modified: 15 Mar 2018